fbpx
Skip to content
McBride inside straight band photo

CHRISTIAN McBRIDE’S INSIDE STRAIGHT

December 6 ‑ December 11

Christian McBride – Bass

Steve Wilson – Alto Saxophone

Warren Wolf – Vibraphone

Peter Martin – Piano

Carl Allen – Drums

TICKETS
The deep, dark-maple tone that Christian McBride elicits from an upright bass is one of jazz’s forthright pleasures, and so is the pleasure he seems to extract from it himself...He calls this band Inside Straight, applying the phrase as a badge of intent and maybe a deflective maneuver: He’ll brand this music as conventional before you ever have the chance. What that says about Mr. McBride is that he has his principles but sees the bigger picture.
— New York Times
Monday Jazz Room

VANGUARD JAZZ ORCHESTRA

Every Monday Night

SAXOPHONES: Dick Oatts (lead alto) Billy Drewes (alto) Rich Perry (tenor) Ralph Lalama (tenor) Gary Smulyan (bari)

TRUMPETS: Nick Marchione (lead trumpet) John Chudoba, Terell Stafford, Scott Wendholt

TROMBONES: Marshall Gilkes (lead trombone) Jason Jackson, Dion Tucker, Douglas Purviance (bass trombone)

RHYTHM SECTION: Adam Birnbaum (piano) David Wong (bass) John Riley (drums)

TICKETS
The Vanguard Jazz Orchestra began its life as the Thad Jones/Mel Lewis Orchestra in 1966.The world-famous Village Vanguard jazz club in New York City booked the newly formed band for three Monday nights that February. Those performances were wildly successful and the engagement was extended indefinitely. The Village Vanguard’s owner, Max Gordon, told Mel Lewis, “We’ll keep it going until it tapers off.” Over half a century and more than 2700 Monday nights later, it still hasn’t. The Vanguard Jazz Orchestra stands apart from all other modern ensembles of its kind and is still as strong and vital as ever.
kenny barron

KENNY BARRON

Quintets

December 13 - 18 

Immanuel Wilkins - Saxophone

Steve Nelson - Vibraphone

Kenny Barron - Piano

Kiyoshi Kitagawa - Bass

Johnathan Blake -  Drums


DECEMBER 20 - 25

Dayna Stephens - Saxophone

Mike Rodriguez - Trumpet

Kenny Barron - Piano

Kiyoshi Kitagawa - Bass

Johnathan Blake -  Drums

TICKETS
The pianist Kenny Barron has a brisk but unostentatious technique and a deceptively casual way with a phrase. He conveys a number of things clearly in his playing; what comes across over all is the quiet hum of effortless erudition. Within his playing you can hear a digest of mainstream jazz piano traditions, with bebop as the root. You can also hear the measured tension of an expert nudging himself toward a challenge.
— New York Times
CHRIS POTTER THUMBNAIL

Photo by Dave Stapleton

Chris Potter Quartet

December 27 - January 1

Chris Potter - Saxophones

Craig Taborn - Piano

Scott Colley - Bass

Marcus Gilmore - Drums


Please note: Shows on NYE are at 9pm & 11pm.

TICKETS
The tenor saxophonist Chris Potter puts enormous force into his sound, and an even greater measure of control. His tone, all over the extended range of the horn, is dry and dark, often brusque: he doesn’t purr or warble, and he treats vibrato as a special indulgence, like a dusting of shaved truffles. He’s fond of thwarted symmetry and surprising digressions. He knows how to build pressure in a solo, and he does this with such extraordinary technical command that his exertions can feel both heroic and routine.
— New York Times

COMING SOON!

January 2 - 8 Closed

The Vanguard will be closed for maintenance. We will reopen Monday, January 9 with the Vanguard Jazz Orchestra.

January 10 - 15 Fred Hersch & Esperanza Spalding

January 17 - 22 David Murray Quartet

with Marta Sanchez, Luke Stewart, Kassa Overall

January 24 - 29 Brad Mehldau Quintet

with Dayna Stephens, Josh Evans, Christian McBride, Joe Farnsworth

January 31 - February 5 Jon Cowherd: Mercy Project

with Chris Potter, Steve Cardenas, John Patitucci, Brian Blade

TICKETS
Changes come and go in Manhattan’s West Village neighborhood, but the basement club occupying 178 Seventh Avenue South since 1935 remains a stable and revered New York City landmark. It’s been tweaked for upkeep over the years, but never to the point where you wouldn’t recognize it. 
— Jed Distler – Steinway.com