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THUMBSCREW

JULY 17th - July 22nd

Mary Halvorson (guitar)

Michael Formanek (bass)

Tomas Fujiwara (drums)

The name of this avant guitar-bass-drums trio might suggest a small object capable of inflicting agonizing pain, but never fear, Thumbscrew take you only a relatively short distance beyond the creative jazz comfort zone. Expect some mild abrasions, but also the sharp focus of skilled improvisers who happen to be fine composers as well.
— All Music

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VANGUARD JAZZ ORCHESTRA

EVERY MONDAY NIGHT SINCE 1966

The Vanguard Jazz Orchestra is the current title for the band that began its life as the Thad Jones/Mel Lewis Jazz Orchestra in 1966 and has performed continuously for over 50 years.

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  Photo by John Abbott

Photo by John Abbott

FRED HERSCH TRIO

JULY 24th - July 29th

Fred Hersch (piano)

John Hébert (bass)

Eric McPherson (drums)

In the quest to describe the music of Fred Hersch in a word — a preposterous task, but not a pointless one — you could do a lot worse than “refinement.” Mr. Hersch is a pianist of cultivated taste and erudition; he’s also the sort of jazz musician who brings a lissome elegance to his playing, disinclined to accentuate the effort behind it all. But there’s another definition of refinement that has to do with painstaking progress, the incremental stretch toward an elusive ideal.
— The New York Times

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GERALD CLAYTON QUINTET

JULY 31st - AUGUST 5th

Logan Richardson (alto sax)

Walter Smith III (tenor sax)

Gerald Clayton (piano)

Joe Sanders (bass)

Marcus Gilmore (drums)

The music is forever moving, riding streams of intriguing, pleasing sounds — ambling grooves, burrowing piano solos and colorful and often unpredictable multi-saxophone lines. All are tributaries of a highly personal music that’s clearly drawn from jazz tradition but headed in new, unexpected directions. It’s brainy, yes, but heavy on emotional content, too.
— Jazziz

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KURT ROSENWINKEL

AUGUST 7th - AUGUST 12th

Kurt Rosenwinkel (guitar)

Dario Fromit (bass)

Greg Hutchinson (drums)

A guitarist whose harmonic ideas and sinuous, legato approach make him readily identifiable, Rosenwinkel is arguably the most beloved jazz guitarist of his generation.
— NPR

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KURT ROSENWINKEL

AUGUST 14th - AUGUST 19th

Kurt Rosenwinkel (guitar)

Aaron Parks (piano)

Eric Revis (bass)

Allan Mednard (drums)

One of the improvisational trademarks of the guitarist Kurt Rosenwinkel is a high, pinging long tone followed by a briskly descending glissando. It’s a dazzling gesture, the sort of thing that elicits whoops and envious murmurs from the musicians in the room. But he makes it seem no more difficult than trailing a finger across a row of percussive bar chimes. The feeling of effortlessness is a big component of his technique.
— New York Times

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HAROLD MABERN TRIO

AUGUST 21st - AUGUST 26th

Harold Mabern (piano)

John Webber (bass)

Joe Farnsworth (drums)

For a practitioner of bluesy hard-bop, New York via Chicago via Memphis is a pretty solid pedigree—particularly when such settings find you called, as Harold Mabern was, to work and study with the likes of Ahmad Jamal, Lee Morgan and Miles Davis.
— Downbeat

  Photo by Jimmy Katz

Photo by Jimmy Katz

JOE LOVANO

AUGUST 28th - SEPTEMBER 2nd

Joe Lovano (saxophone)

Lawrence Fields (piano)

Marc Johnson (bass)

Andrew Cyrille (drums)

Long ago he developed a tenor saxophone sound for his temperament. It rolls and smears and smokes, all width, rhythmic unto itself; it can fit in or accommodate. His starting place is bebop’s complex language, but he seems to be listening to something underneath language and style, something that could be well illustrated by jazz but isn’t specific to it. He’s good with a particular rhythm, or a structure, or a set of changes, but he doesn’t need any of it. And so an ideal Joe Lovano performance might be one that sounds good with New York’s advanced-harmony killer elite, but that could be effectively cut and pasted over a trap beat or a string quartet or scale exercises or traffic sounds.
— New York Times

  Photo by Philippe Levy Stab

Photo by Philippe Levy Stab

BILL CHARLAP TRIO

SEPTEMBER 4th - SEPTEMBER 9th

Bill Charlap (piano)

Peter Washington (bass)

Kenny Washington (drums)

As a unit, this must be one of the best piano trios ever, and certainly as instantly recognisable as any of its great predecessors. Charlap’s touch on the keyboard is light, almost stealthy, even when playing full chords, but always firm, clear and beautifully articulated. With the spirited support of bassist Peter Washington and drummer Kenny Washington (famously unrelated), the total effect is just perfect. As always, Charlap’s playing provides convincing proof that it is still possible to create fresh but pertinent treatments of well-known standard songs.
— The Gaurdian

  Photo by Philippe Levy Stab

Photo by Philippe Levy Stab

BILL CHARLAP TRIO

SEPTEMBER 11th - SEPTEMBER 16th

Bill Charlap (piano)

Peter Washington (bass)

Kenny Washington (drums)

As a unit, this must be one of the best piano trios ever, and certainly as instantly recognisable as any of its great predecessors. Charlap’s touch on the keyboard is light, almost stealthy, even when playing full chords, but always firm, clear and beautifully articulated. With the spirited support of bassist Peter Washington and drummer Kenny Washington (famously unrelated), the total effect is just perfect. As always, Charlap’s playing provides convincing proof that it is still possible to create fresh but pertinent treatments of well-known standard songs.
— The Gaurdian

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BILL STEWART TRIO

SEPTEMBER 18th - SEPTEMBER 23rd

Walter Smith III (saxophone)

Larry Grenadier (bass)

Bill Stewart (drums)

Bill Stewart is the furthest thing from a basher. His taste and intelligence and counterintuitive relationships to time have made him a favorite drummer of people like John Scofield and Pat Metheny...Stewart is an intriguing composer and a leader with a coherent aesthetic based on the same qualities as his drumming: understatement, dry wit, unpredictable decision-making, esoteric lyricism.
— Jazz Times

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CHRIS POTTER TRIO

SEPTEMBER 25th - SEPTEMBER 30th

Chris Potter (saxophone)

James Francies (piano)

Eric Harland (drums)

There are moments, in the tumble of a typical improvisation, when the saxophonist Chris Potter seems to be embarked on a hero’s journey. With his strong, focused tone and top-to-bottom proficiency on the horn, he brings a robust physical presence to his playing and an onward-driving sense of purpose. His deployment of notes, parceled into staccato bursts or gracefully arcing phrases, suggests a split-second calculation of risk and reward. He works with an intuitive logic, venturing far from a theme and only gradually returning there, all the while responding to the changing conditions set by his band.
— New York Times